WHO: number of obese children increased dramatically

WHO: number of obese children increased dramatically



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Obesity and obesity are increasing worldwide
All over the world there are more and more people suffering from obesity. The number of people who are overweight and obese is continuously increasing. More and more children and adolescents are also affected by the problem.

Obesity is a common problem. More and more children are weighing too much and eating unhealthily. At least 41 million children under the age of five are overweight or obese, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It is surprising that their number is growing fastest in developing countries, the WHO said in its report on ending childhood obesity.

The number of overweight children has doubled in the past 25 years
More and more children are overweight or suffering from obesity. The number of overweight children has increased by 11 million since 1990. There are now more overweight and obese children in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries, the WHO experts explain. Globalization and urbanization have doubled the number of overweight children in developing countries to 15.5 million. In 1990 this figure was around 7.5 million.

Obesity and obesity are issues that have a lasting impact on the child's quality of life. Obesity creates a variety of ailments, including physical, psychological, and health effects, says Sania Nishtar of the Ending Childhood Obesity (ECHO) initiative. Obesity can also affect our educational success, the researchers warn. Obese children often remain overweight into adulthood, which poses great health and economic risks for those affected and their families. Marketing for unhealthy food and drink has been the main driver of the rise in overweight and obese children, especially in developing countries, the WHO scientists explain.

WHO demands: Healthy food, physical activity and a healthy school environment
Almost half of the overweight and obese children under the age of five live in Asia and about 25 percent live in Africa. There, the number of overweight children has almost doubled in the past 25 years. Libya, Egypt, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Botswana have the highest proportion of overweight children in African countries, according to the WHO. If there is no access to sufficient nutritious food in early childhood, the risk of obesity increases as the food intake and activity of those affected begin to change, the doctors say. Children of migrants and the indigenous population are at higher risk of obesity, experts say. The rapid cultural changes and limited access to medical care are responsible for this, the doctors add.

The World Health Organization says it will work more closely with governments to introduce a wide range of measures to address the causes of obesity and overweight. Such measures help ensure that children have a healthy start in life, emphasizes Peter Gluckman, one of the ECHO co-chairs. Governments should promote healthy food, physical activity, and a healthy school environment to tackle obesity and obesity, the WHO experts said.

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Video: Cardiovascular Risk of Childhood Obesity. Childrens National Medical Center